Overcome Gender Bias in Funding

There is an unconscious bias among venture capitalists that is preventing female entrepreneurs from securing more funding, new research suggests.

A study set to be published in an upcoming issue of the Academy of Management Journal revealed that venture capitalists have different expectations of men and women entrepreneurs, which in turn impacts how much, if any, money they give them.

The research argues that the bias comes in the form of the questions venture capitalists pose to entrepreneurs when trying to learn more about their startups. Specifically, women are asked questions that focus on how they won’t lose a venture capitalist’s money, while the questions to men focus on how much money they can make.

“Female entrepreneurs are implicitly expected to prove that they can execute a safe return for the investor, whereas male entrepreneurs are instead expected to show the opportunity can grow,” the study’s authors wrote.

In turn, the answers the entrepreneurs give match the focus of those questions. The researchers said this prompts female business owners to position their startups as “playing not to lose,” referred to as prevention-focused, while men are better able to position themselves as “playing to win,” referred to as promotion-focused – the latter of which is much more appealing to investors.

The study’s authors said the unconscious bias comes from investors of both genders.

“Both male and female venture capitalists display implicit bias, holding men and women to different standards, [which] implies that the funding disparity cannot be corrected by merely ensuring that more female VCs are in a position to evaluate investment opportunities,” the study’s authors wrote.

Researchers came to their conclusions after analyzing the questions posed by venture capitalists at TechCrunch Disrupt, a startup competition held annually in major cities around the world. Since its launch in 2009, entrepreneurs who have presented at the competition have raised about $7 billion in venture funding over their lifetimes.

For part of the research, the study’s authors looked at data involving 189 startups that presented at the New York competitions organized by TechCrunch Disrupt from 2010 through 2016. The researchers specifically looked at video footage of Q&As between each company’s founder and a panel of venture capitalists. After transcribing all of the videos, they were able to determine the balance between promotion focus and prevention focus in company-panel interactions and the relationship of this balance to companies’ funding achievements over time.